Beverage fluoride intakes and dental fluorosis

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Beverage fluoride intakes and dental fluorosis

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First Posted: 09 Mar 2006 06:29 pm

Abstract from research to be presented at the 2006 ADEA/AADR/CADR Conference in Orlando, Florida, March 6 - 11, 2006

"Beverage fluoride intakes and dental fluorosis of the permanent incisors"

T.A. MARSHALL, B. BROFFITT, J.M. EICHENBERGER-GILMORE, J.J. WARREN, and S.M. LEVY, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA

Fluoride intakes from beverages are due to both the quantity of beverage consumed and the concentration of fluoride in the beverage. We previously described associations between fluoride intakes from beverages provided during infancy and dental fluorosis of the primary teeth. Objective: Our current objective was to investigate associations between dental fluorosis of the permanent incisors and intakes of beverages provided during infancy and early childhood and fluoride from these beverages among participants in the Iowa Fluoride Study. Methods: Beverage intakes were reported by parents on 3-day diaries at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36 months of age and categorized by beverage type (human milk, cows milk, total infant formula, 100% juice, water, other beverages). Fluoride concentrations of purchased beverages and water used in home beverage preparation were assayed in our laboratory or obtained from public sources. Median daily intakes of beverages and fluoride intakes from beverages were estimated at each time point. Dental examinations (n = 408) were completed at 7.7-12.0 years of age. Fluorosis cases were defined as having a score of 2 or 3 with the Fluorosis Risk Index for 1 or more incisors; cervical zones were excluded due to incomplete eruption. Results: Prevalence of fluorosis was 35.8%. Children with fluorosis consumed less milk at 9 months and more 100% juice at 16 months than children without fluorosis (p < 0.05). Children with fluorosis consumed more fluoride from infant formulas at 6 and 9 months, from 100% juice at 12, 16 and 20 months, and from all beverages at 6, 9, 12, 16, 24 and 36 months than children without fluorosis (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Fluoride intakes from beverages during infancy and early childhood contribute to fluorosis of the permanent incisors.

Supported by NIDCR (RO1-DE09551, RO1-DE12101 and MO1-RR00059).

SOURCE:
http://iadr.confex.com/iadr/2006Orld/te ... _75136.htm
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